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House Republican Office Daily Clips

 

HOUSE REPUBLICAN OFFICE

FEBRUARY 1, 2017 DAILY CLIPS

 

STATE GOVERNMENT

 

14 things to know about the Oregon Legislature

The Oregonian

Oregon’s 79th Legislative Assembly convenes today. Here’s what you need to know about this year’s session, by the numbers.

 

Oregon Legislative Session To Kick Off Amid Budget Questions

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Republicans serve in the minority in both chambers but Democrats would need a handful of GOP votes in order to pass a tax increase. Ferrioli and most others in his party say any tax hike would need to be paired with cost-cutting measures, including to the state’s public pension system. At a preview ahead of the legislative session, a reporter asked House Republican leader Mike McLane if he could give a detailed list of cuts he’d like to make.

 

“Well sure I could,” McLane responded. “But you’d have to endure a 45 minute presentation with slides.” But McLane said there’s a general principle he’d follow if he were in charge.

“One of the ways you have to do it is to just not accept the premise that everything you did last year has to be done this year,” he said.

 

United Streetcar is About to Get Its Tax Break Cancelled. Here Are Five Other Tax Giveaways That Oregon Could Scrap.

Willamette Week

Small-business pass-through income

$120 million

In the so-called “Grand Bargain” of 2013, Democrats won Republican votes for pension cuts (which Republicans desperately wanted) by granting tax cuts to the owners of small businesses that employ at least one person. “You don’t have to do anything for the tax break,” Wiser says. “You don’t have to hire anybody. You just have to be an owner.” But Republicans who fought hard for small business say a deal’s a deal. “It’s been a little over three years since [House Speaker] Tina Kotek and [Senate President] Peter Courtney agreed to the Grand Bargain,” says Rep. Mike McLane (R-Powell Butte). “I would sure hope that their word has a longer shelf life than that.

 

Oregon far short of greenhouse gas emissions goals, report says

The Oregonian

Oregon is not reducing carbon dioxide emissions fast enough to meet its goals for 2020 and beyond, a new report finds. In fact, it’s not even close. Those are the findings of a biennial report the Oregon Global Warming Commission will deliver to state lawmakers this week, and they come despite ambitious legislation passed to cut emissions from the electricity and transportation sectors.

 

Oregon Promise’s future not guaranteed heading into legislative session

The Oregonian

Even such higher education advocates as state Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton, and the community colleges’ lobbying organization, are unsure of the program’s future. “There’s no doubt that under the current scenario, all programs, virtually, would take a serious hit,” said Hass, who is working on a plan to raise more revenue for the state. “My hope, though, is that (the $10 million earmarked by Devlin and Nathanson) was sort of a line in the sand.”

 

Corporate Lobbyists Turned Oregon’s Iconic Bottle Bill Into a Sweet Payday For Their Clients

Willamette Week

On April 1, the deposit for returnable cans and bottles in Oregon will increase for the first time in history. Now, when you buy a bottle of Black Butte Porter or a can of LaCroix, you’ll pay a dime instead of a nickel. That’s because of a bill the Oregon Legislature passed six years ago.

 

PERS reform hearings start Oregon legislative session

The Statesman Journal

The Oregon Legislature will get right to work on what could be one of the most contentious issues of the 2017 session – trying to reduce costs associated with PERS, the Public Employees Retirement System. The Senate Committee on Workforce will hold hearings on the issue beginning Wednesday, the first day of the session.

 

Legislature told to target transportation to get Oregon on course to meet failing emissions goals

Portland Business Journal

A state commission is pointing to a potential 2017 transportation funding package in the Legislature as a key tool for getting Oregon on track to meeting its carbon emissions goals. In a draft report to the Legislature set to be issued today — the day the 2017 legislative session opens in Salem — the Oregon Global Warming Commission writes that a “key takeaway” is that “rising transportation emissions are driving increases in statewide emissions.The Commission recommends that the 2017 Legislature, in addressing Oregon’s overall transportation and transportation funding needs, use the occasion to devise and adopt measures that will bring transportation GHG emissions under control and aligned with Oregon’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals,” the report says.

 

Oregon legislators from Lane County area focus on pet projects and peeves in upcoming Salem session

The Register-Guard

In a first big batch of bills introduced before the session, Lane County lawmakers have submitted notable proposals to limit hospital costs, bolster women’s health care coverage, offer electric-vehicle incentives, install traffic cameras at red lights, and increase state taxes on timber.

 

Shell company legislation awaits Oregon lawmakers

KGW

Oregon lawmakers could hear as many as four bills related to anonymous company abuse during the legislative session that starts Wednesday. Former Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins pre-session filed three of the bills and credited the Business Journal’s reporting last year when announcing her intent to develop legislation. The bills would address the problems illustrated in an October 2015 Business Journal investigation that connected an Aloha house to a California “corporation mill” and a global web of fraud.

 

Grants Pass State Representative Speaks at Statewide Launch of Every Child Program

KAJO

Representative Stark said he was proud to see Every Child and DHS find a way to inspire community support that’s working. He said they have found a new way to tap into the hearts of community members to remind them of their love and duty to care for children and they’re doing it at success rate never seen before.

 

Oregon governor creates Trump resistance team

The Oregonian

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown is trying to amass a group of volunteers to resist the Trump administration while promoting her. In an email her campaign sent to supporters Tuesday, Brown said Donald Trump’s first actions as president “have attacked our values as Americans and as Oregonians.” “Now, more than ever, we must bring communities together to resist in a divided nation,” the message continues.

 

State Representative Sal Esquivel is proposing a sales tax to replace property tax

KOBI Medford

Oregonians have said it time and time again that they don’t want a sales tax. Voters have turned down various versions 9 times in the last 90 years. But Representative Sal Esquivel is hoping Oregon voters will change their minds. Esquivel wants to impose a 4.5% sales tax on non-essential items to replace property taxes on the first $500,000 dollars of owner-occupied homes.

 

Gov. Brown names new economic policy advisor

The Oregonian

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday announced the latest addition to her office: Jason Lewis-Berry, a former official at the U.S. Department of State, will advise the governor on economic and jobs policy.

 

OREGONIANS IN CONGRESS

 

Oregon’s Greg Walden, with new White House clout, meets with Trump, Pence to tackle prescription drug costs

The Oregonian

Trump declared “in no uncertain terms” that the government must find a way to reduce drug prices, Walden said in an interview with The Oregonian/OregonLive. But Trump also praised the drug company executives in attendance for providing important medications to U.S. consumers, Walden said. Walden said the meeting was a “very positive discussion” and that Trump was “pretty emphatic” that pharmaceutical companies must reduce the price of their drugs and work to keep their domestic labor force.  “We have to get prices down,” Walden said. “That should be news to consumers’ ears.”

 

Oregon’s Greg Walden supports Trump ban on refugee immigration, but criticizes its rollout

The Oregonian

Greg Walden, Oregon’s lone Republican congressman, approves of the motive behind president Donald J. Trump’s executive order curtailing immigration and refugee programs, but criticized its rollout as less than stellar. In an interview with The Oregonian/OregonLive, Walden said he supports protecting the nation from foreign threats, including immigrants or refugees who would seek to do harm.

 

ENVIRONMENT

 

EPA cutbacks and Oregon’s environment: What we know

KGW

As the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality works to rebound from a tumultuous 2016, the agency now faces an uncertain future in light of the Trump administration’s planned cutbacks at the federal Environmental Protection Agency. DEQ officials say questions surround the agency’s access to research, communications and budget, impacting its ability to monitor environmental health hazards in Oregon.

 

HOUSING

 

Landlords warns of unintended consequences of required renter relocation assistance

Portland Tribune

Landlord lobbyist John DiLorenzo says there will be unintended consequences of the City Council requires landlord to pay the relocation costs of tenants subject to no-caused evictions.

 

Proposed tenant protections could draw lawsuit, limit affordable housing supply

The Oregonian

If the rule takes effect, Portland landlords will have to go through the just-cause eviction process if they want a tenant out and don’t want to help pay moving costs. Eudaly’s policy will require landlords to pay that money for all no-cause evictions, said her policy director, Jamey Duhamel.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: It’s time for the Legislature to get to work

Democrat Herald Editorial Board

The first half of the session will be dominated by what legislators sometimes call “dogs and cats” — hundreds of bills that might address an important issue, but don’t necessarily fit into the Legislature’s major storylines. So we can expect discussions on topics as disparate as affordable housing, gun control, marijuana legalization, a carbon cap-and-invest program to combat greenhouse gas emissions, requirements for some businesses to enact so-called “predictive scheduling” for their employees and many others. Judging by some of the partisan tussling that already has occurred, this session might also include an unusual amount of feuding between Democrats and Republicans.

 

Editorial: Renters relocation assistance measure is short-sighted

The Oregonian Editorial Board

The measure is big-hearted in that it seeks to offset an economic cruelty. Tenants of the 18-unit Normandy Apartments in Northeast Portland, for example, this year face rent increases of 100 percent, Eudaly told The Oregonian/OregonLive Editorial Board, and some 40 children are among the residents. Yet provisions of the measure are honed to ensure landlords can continue to charge whatever they want. Only in those instances in which a rent hike hits 10 percent or more will a tenant choosing to move out be paid relocation expenses indexed to apartment size: $2,900 for the studio tenant, $3,300 for one-bedroom dwellers, $4,200 for two-bedroom occupants, $4,500 for those leasing a three-bedroom unit. If several families were to move from the Normandy in the coming months, under the terms of Eudaly’s measure they would, as a group, be paid a hefty sum.

 

Editorial: Will we pay the price of sanctuary?

Democrat Herald Editorial Board

How much federal money might be at risk locally if the Trump administration follows through? It’s hard to say: It’s not clear which grants might be affected. There is no clear definition of what is meant by a “sanctuary city” or “sanctuary state.” It’s not clear whether the president needs congressional approval. It’s not even clear whether the action is legal, although it seems to be a sure bet that litigation awaits.

 

Editorial: Sen. Jeff Merkley becomes Sen. Filibuster

The Bend Bulletin Editorial Board

When his party controlled the Senate, Oregon Democrat Jeff Merkley was a leading opponent of the filibuster, which Republicans, then in the minority, were using to block various presidential nominations. Now that Republicans control both the presidency and the Senate, however, Merkley has refashioned himself as Sen. Filibuster. He says he will use the tool to block any Donald Trump nominee to the Supreme Court who is not Merrick Garland. Turnabout, it seems, is fair play.

 

Guest: Oregon’s decision compromises salmon and integrity

Washington State Representative Liz Pike, (R-18)

With broken promises from our sister state to the south, it will be difficult to embrace any future bi-state co-management strategies with Oregon. We are now faced with immediate enforcement challenges for both Washington and Oregon as they navigate an imaginary line between our two states on the Columbia River. Perhaps the silver lining will be more Washington fishing licenses sold to Oregon recreational anglers.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

Trump Nominates Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court

The New York Times

President Trump on Tuesday nominated Judge Neil M. Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, elevating a conservative in the mold of Justice Antonin Scalia to succeed the late jurist and touching off a brutal, partisan showdown at the start of his presidency over the ideological bent of the nation’s highest court.

 

Senate Dems Ramp Up Opposition to Trump Nominees

RealClearPolitics

Congressional Democrats have launched into full hardball mode. Fueled by a newly energized liberal base, lawmakers are ratcheting up their opposition to President Trump and embracing obstructionist tactics they once decried by delaying votes on remaining Cabinet nominees, boycotting committee votes, and debating a filibuster for Neil Gorsuch, Trump’s pick for the Supreme Court.

 

Amid Political Rancor, ACA Sign-Up Deadline Arrives

The Wall Street Journal

Democrats’ move to stall—at least temporarily—Mr. Price’s confirmation to head that agency also throws a wrench into efforts by Republicans to speed along the ACA repeal. Mr. Trump has signaled through an executive order signed on Inauguration Day that as health secretary, Mr. Price could play a significant role in striking the law on his own if Congress failed to act.

 

Ryan calls immigration order rollout ‘regrettable,’ defends Trump

Fox News

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Tuesday that the “confusion” surrounding the rollout of President Trump’s immigration executive order was “regrettable,” though he defended the national security goals of the sweeping measure signed late last week.

 

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