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Daily Clips

 

HOUSE REPUBLICAN OFFICE

MAY 15, 2017 DAILY CLIPS

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLICY

 

BUDGET

 

Will Gov. Brown’s Plans For A Sale Of State Assets Reap Big Dollars For Oregon?

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Gov. Kate Brown has an ambitious plan to raise $5 billion by selling off a wide range of public assets, from surplus property to possibly even some state agencies. This kind of thing has been happening in the U.S. for a long time where the current politicians decide they need cash now and figure out how to get it,” said Robert Barone, a Reno-based economist and investment fund adviser who has written on the topic. “But then it’s mortgaging the future because the building they sold to the private sector now requires that the taxpayers through taxes pay the private sector for rents in that building.”

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

Oregon took months to fix lead problems at juvenile prisons

The Oregonian

Full-scale testing of youth prisons in February and March came nearly six months after the state finished lead inspections on 40 other buildings where state employees lived or worked, including the governor’s mansion and the Oregon Capitol. A spokesman for the Oregon Youth Authority blamed unforeseen contracting problems for testing delays. “We have tried to be very conscientious and focus on the health of our youth and staff,” Benjamin Chambers said. “We didn’t want it to take this long.”

 

HELMET BILL

 

Mother’s death on a rafting trip inspires ‘helmet bill’ in Oregon

KATU

Senate Bill 643 is her answer. The bill would require any outfitter and guide to offer helmets to passengers on waters rated Class III or above. Rapids are ranked on a class scale of 1 to 6, with 6 being the most challenging. Zach Collier already offers helmets to his passengers, but he says it wouldn’t make sense to force them to wear one. “Sometimes it’s unsafe. If it’s super warm, it can create heat injuries.”

 

LOCAL NEWS

 

Portland voters to decide on $790 million spending package to fix school lead

Associated Press

The $790 million spending package that would raise taxes to address the crisis has generated intense interest in an otherwise sleepy election as residents revisit lingering questions about how administrators in the 49,000-student district handled the discovery of lead levels that surpassed federal standards in the water at dozens of schools.

 

Prineville passes on resolution to welcome everyone, citizen or not

Bend Bulletin

A request that Prineville city councilors declare the city open to anyone, regardless of immigration status or gender identity, raised doubts last week about whether a majority of Prineville residents would approve. “We know our community pretty well, and we know there are some people here — I bet at least 60 percent of our citizens — who would say that if people want to come to the U.S., then they should take the route of legal entry, not illegal entry,” Roppe said. “We’re here to represent the majority of our citizens.”

 

OTHER STORIES

 

In Trump era, record numbers of Oregonians running for office

The Oregonian

“There is incredibly heightened interest among the populace in how our government functions at the federal level,” he said. That may well have spurred Oregonians to act locally, he said.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Tackling opioids

Register Guard

If the state task force Brown is forming is serious about dealing with this epidemic, there are worse places look than Lane County, where a number of physicians and health care organizations have been looking at ways to reduce opioid abuse and better treat pain. These range from alternative treatments such as weight loss, exercise and meditation on up to creation of chronic pain centers offering a multi-pronged approach for the most complex cases. The interest now being shown by state and federal officials is encouraging news. If they follow through with their commitments, the result will be better pain management, reduced drug abuse and healthier communities.

 

Guest: Simplified tax can mend broken system

Nancy Nathanson and Phil Barnhart, both Eugene Democrats, represent District 13 and District 11, respectively, in the Oregon House of Representatives.

We think there’s a different way we can approach this. Along with House Speaker Tina Kotek, we’ve presented a bold yet prudent proposal that will finally allow us to make significant, strategic investments in our schools. Under this proposal, we could fund kindergarten-through-12th-grade schools at a level that would allow school districts to finally add back school days, reduce class sizes, and add back programs that improve graduation rates. The proposal calls for $200 million in strategic initiatives, like teacher mentoring, hiring school nurses, improving graduation rates and supporting better school nutrition. We can build workforce and career training programs that prepare students to work in emerging industries.

We can make the promise of an affordable college education real again, and we can build the kind of future for our state that we all want.

 

Guest: Oregon desperately needs revenue reform

Tass Morrison serves on the North Santiam School Board and the Oregon School Boards Association Board.

Our state elected officials face no greater issue today than finding a sustainable system for paying for government services. Indeed, it is the only work that counts now.   I urge them, and anyone who cares about our children’s future, to bring the issue of revenue reform into focus – immediately. We need to couple that work with containing costs on PERS and health care, and chart a course for the foreseeable future that provides today’s generation with the same educational opportunities that we enjoyed in our youth.

 

 

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