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Archive for the ‘Educational’ Category

Daily Clips

 

HOUSE REPUBLICAN OFFICE

MAY 15, 2017 DAILY CLIPS

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLICY

 

BUDGET

 

Will Gov. Brown’s Plans For A Sale Of State Assets Reap Big Dollars For Oregon?

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Gov. Kate Brown has an ambitious plan to raise $5 billion by selling off a wide range of public assets, from surplus property to possibly even some state agencies. This kind of thing has been happening in the U.S. for a long time where the current politicians decide they need cash now and figure out how to get it,” said Robert Barone, a Reno-based economist and investment fund adviser who has written on the topic. “But then it’s mortgaging the future because the building they sold to the private sector now requires that the taxpayers through taxes pay the private sector for rents in that building.”

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

Oregon took months to fix lead problems at juvenile prisons

The Oregonian

Full-scale testing of youth prisons in February and March came nearly six months after the state finished lead inspections on 40 other buildings where state employees lived or worked, including the governor’s mansion and the Oregon Capitol. A spokesman for the Oregon Youth Authority blamed unforeseen contracting problems for testing delays. “We have tried to be very conscientious and focus on the health of our youth and staff,” Benjamin Chambers said. “We didn’t want it to take this long.”

 

HELMET BILL

 

Mother’s death on a rafting trip inspires ‘helmet bill’ in Oregon

KATU

Senate Bill 643 is her answer. The bill would require any outfitter and guide to offer helmets to passengers on waters rated Class III or above. Rapids are ranked on a class scale of 1 to 6, with 6 being the most challenging. Zach Collier already offers helmets to his passengers, but he says it wouldn’t make sense to force them to wear one. “Sometimes it’s unsafe. If it’s super warm, it can create heat injuries.”

 

LOCAL NEWS

 

Portland voters to decide on $790 million spending package to fix school lead

Associated Press

The $790 million spending package that would raise taxes to address the crisis has generated intense interest in an otherwise sleepy election as residents revisit lingering questions about how administrators in the 49,000-student district handled the discovery of lead levels that surpassed federal standards in the water at dozens of schools.

 

Prineville passes on resolution to welcome everyone, citizen or not

Bend Bulletin

A request that Prineville city councilors declare the city open to anyone, regardless of immigration status or gender identity, raised doubts last week about whether a majority of Prineville residents would approve. “We know our community pretty well, and we know there are some people here — I bet at least 60 percent of our citizens — who would say that if people want to come to the U.S., then they should take the route of legal entry, not illegal entry,” Roppe said. “We’re here to represent the majority of our citizens.”

 

OTHER STORIES

 

In Trump era, record numbers of Oregonians running for office

The Oregonian

“There is incredibly heightened interest among the populace in how our government functions at the federal level,” he said. That may well have spurred Oregonians to act locally, he said.

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Tackling opioids

Register Guard

If the state task force Brown is forming is serious about dealing with this epidemic, there are worse places look than Lane County, where a number of physicians and health care organizations have been looking at ways to reduce opioid abuse and better treat pain. These range from alternative treatments such as weight loss, exercise and meditation on up to creation of chronic pain centers offering a multi-pronged approach for the most complex cases. The interest now being shown by state and federal officials is encouraging news. If they follow through with their commitments, the result will be better pain management, reduced drug abuse and healthier communities.

 

Guest: Simplified tax can mend broken system

Nancy Nathanson and Phil Barnhart, both Eugene Democrats, represent District 13 and District 11, respectively, in the Oregon House of Representatives.

We think there’s a different way we can approach this. Along with House Speaker Tina Kotek, we’ve presented a bold yet prudent proposal that will finally allow us to make significant, strategic investments in our schools. Under this proposal, we could fund kindergarten-through-12th-grade schools at a level that would allow school districts to finally add back school days, reduce class sizes, and add back programs that improve graduation rates. The proposal calls for $200 million in strategic initiatives, like teacher mentoring, hiring school nurses, improving graduation rates and supporting better school nutrition. We can build workforce and career training programs that prepare students to work in emerging industries.

We can make the promise of an affordable college education real again, and we can build the kind of future for our state that we all want.

 

Guest: Oregon desperately needs revenue reform

Tass Morrison serves on the North Santiam School Board and the Oregon School Boards Association Board.

Our state elected officials face no greater issue today than finding a sustainable system for paying for government services. Indeed, it is the only work that counts now.   I urge them, and anyone who cares about our children’s future, to bring the issue of revenue reform into focus – immediately. We need to couple that work with containing costs on PERS and health care, and chart a course for the foreseeable future that provides today’s generation with the same educational opportunities that we enjoyed in our youth.

 

 

Socialist Dieting

Kate Brown Tries To Rewrite History

Wilsonville, OR – After years of highly public struggles with Obamacare, failed Oregon governor Kate Brown is trying to rewrite history regarding the state’s problems with the failed healthcare law as it heads for potential repeal in Congress.

In an interview on MSNBC, Brown praised the failed law, calling it “cost-effective.” But it appears Kate Brown hasn’t paid much attention to the headlines on Obamacare in Oregon for the last few years. Last July, Oregon’s Health Exchange Co-Op, known as Cover Oregon, was forced to close due to poor finances following catastrophic technical and service failures, producing embarrassing national headlines:

The Washington Examiner reported:

“Oregon’s insurance regulator closed the co-op late Friday due to poor finances, meaning that 15 of the original 23 co-ops have collapsed. The closures have cost taxpayers more than $1.5 billion in startup and solvency loans.

Oregon’s Health CO-OP was put in receivership on Friday and regulators gave its 20,600 policyholders until the end of the month to find a new plan…

The co-op lost $18.4 million last year, mostly because of high claims from policyholders.

What also didn’t help was Obamacare’s risk-adjustment program, which transfers funds from insurers with healthy enrollees to insurers with the sickest claims.”

Oregon’s Obamacare implosion was even the subject of an investigation by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which released a report detailing the systemic issues with Oregon’s Obamacare system:

“In letters to Attorneys General Lynch and Rosenblum, Chairman Chaffetz wrote, ‘The documents and testimony show Oregon State officials misused $305 million of federal funds and improperly coordinated with former Governor John Kitzhaber’s campaign advisers. Official decisions were made primarily for political purposes. Cover Oregon was established as an independent organization by the legislature, and was not intended to be a wholly controlled subsidiary of the Governor’s political apparatus. Evidence obtained by the Committee shows, however, close coordination between Governor Kitzhaber, his official staff, his campaign advisers, and the supposedly independent Cover Oregon. The evidence we have uncovered implicates violations of state laws that restrict political activity by public employees.’”

U.S. News reported:

“Here, in brief, is what the committee found:

State law clearly established Cover Oregon as an independent entity. The governor and his political advisers’ involvement in Cover Oregon was inconsistent with Oregon law.
Campaign funds were used to assist the governor in his official capacity while handling Cover Oregon.
Cover Oregon became closely tied with all campaign activities, from polling to meetings.
The governor’s political operatives – none had technological experience – micromanaged many of the decisions that needed to be made regarding Cover Oregon.
Junking Cover Oregon and moving to HealthCare.gov was viewed as a way to “let the steam out of so much of the attacks.
“The Cover Oregon board was told the cost of moving to HealthCare.gov was $4-6 million. A slide showing moving the Medicaid system would cost $36 million was deleted.
After the governor complained about the “free independent expenditure campaign” his political opponent was receiving because of Cover Oregon, his political advisers drafted letters asking the attorney general to sue. The letter was sent days later.
In sum, the committee says, “Cover Oregon failed for two main reasons: The state acted as their own system integrator (like HealthCare.gov), and the state tried to revamp its entire healthcare system, not just build an exchange.”

·

“Now, Kate Brown has her staff engaging in political activity while no one is working to get to the bottom of what happened to the $305 million Cover Oregon funds that were lost,” stated Chair Currier. “These funds would come in very handy right now as Brown claims to be doing everything she can to close the sizable $1.8 billion deficit.”

“As Kate Brown continues to bury her head in the sand with regards to Oregon’s disastrous results with its Obamacare experiment, Oregonians learned firsthand just how calamitous it proved for their healthcare,” noted Currier. “If Kate Brown is unwilling to accept the reality that millions of Oregonians face with the disastrous Democrat healthcare law, she has no business serving another term as governor in 2018.”

Link to Online Posting:

https://oregon.gop/oregon-dem-gov-kate-brown-rewrites-obamacare-history-2017-05-09

The Oregon Republican Party is the state’s arm of the Republican National Committee. It’s Chairman and officers are dedicated to promoting Republican principles within the state of Oregon and to improving the lives and livelihoods of Oregon’s working families through economic freedom and equal protection under the law.

###

Oregon Republican Party

Communications Director

Kevin Hoar
Email: [email protected]

Website: Oregon.GOP

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oregonrepublicanparty/

Twitter: @Oregon_GOP

XML Feed: https://oregon.gop/rss.xml

Main: (503) 595-8881

Fax: (503) 697-5555

Headquarters: 25375 SW Parkway Ave, Suite 200, Wilsonville, OR 97070

ORP Daily Clips

HOUSE REPUBLICAN OFFICE

MAY 7, 2017 DAILY CLIPS

STATE GOVERNMENT & POLICY

 

Happening at the Capitol this week: business taxes, marionberry pie

Statesman Journal

The Oregon Legislature is slowly getting to the meat of budget matters this week with approval of some minor agency budgets by the Joint Ways and Means Committee and a third public meeting of the Joint Tax Reform Committee — while a flurry of odds-and-ends bills move through House and Senate chambers.

 

HOUSING

 

Rent control on the table in Legislature amid housing crunch

Register Guard

Landlords around the state told lawmakers that the momentum of the new bill has made them nervous. Some of the landlords said they have held off on making new property purchases, waiting first to see if rent control becomes a reality. Neighborhood Partner­ships­, a Portland-based nonprofit organization, is among the groups fighting for legislation allowing rent control in Ore­gon. “What we are hearing from all around the state is that tenants are experiencing these unbelievably large rent increases and it is pushing them out of the homes that they live in,” Neighborhood Partnerships­ Deputy Director Alison McIntosh said. “They’re basically being economically evicted from the homes that they’ve had, and that doesn’t help us create healthy, stable communities.”

 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

 

Clyde Saiki will step out as state human services director

Portland Tribune

Clyde Saiki says he is retiring after two tumultuous years as director of the Department of Human Services, which has the largest agency workforce, and a total of 30 years in state government. “In his three decades of service to the State of Oregon, Clyde has demonstrated exemplary leadership at every agency,” Brown said in a statement. “I would like to thank him for his contributions to DHS and for his continued leadership through the summer to ensure a smooth transition when Fariborz takes the helm on Sept. 1.”

 

DHS director Clyde Saiki will retire; governor names his replacement

The Oregonian

Oregon political leaders said Saiki, 60, has made a positive impact during his short time leading the the department. Rep. Duane Stark, R-Grants Pass, who sits on the House Human Services Committee, said he appreciates Saiki’s work to put the department back on track. “It’s far from being where it needs to be, but I’m personally sad to see him go,” Stark said. “He’ll be greatly missed.”

HEALTH CARE

 

Greenlick Fights to Defend CCO Reforms in House Rules Committee

The Lund Report

The House Health Chairman now hopes to pass a compromise arrangement brokered by House Speaker Tina Kotek that would allow the Oregon Health Authority to set the rules to protect the state’s Medicaid reserves from Wall Street poaching and make sure those tax dollars are spent on community health.

 

OTHER STORIES

 

Patti Smith’s life defined by adventure, assisting others

Mountain Outlook

While she was working, Patti continued to be heavily involved in the community. She was a member of the Columbia Grange, and served four terms in the Oregon House of Representatives from 2001 to 2009. During her eight years representing District 52, she strived to be a voice for the people and acknowledge her constituents’ and colleagues’ needs, serving as assistant Speaker of the House for part of her term. “My sister would always surprise people who called her legislative office because she’d be the one to answer the phone,” Cartisser said. “That was just the kind of person she was.”

 

OPINION

 

Editorial: Brown is late, limited in budget ideas

The Oregonian

If Oregonians had hoped Gov. Kate Brown could deliver a grand plan this legislative session that would help lift the state budget out of its deep deficit and define a path toward sustained financial stability, they’re likely as disappointed as we are.Brown should translate her nuanced executive orders to share the larger visions that may stand behind them. Addressing Oregon’s unfunded liability and scrutinizing the cost of public employee pay and health care are solid steps in the right direction. Instead of walking a careful line to the 2018 gubernatorial election, the governor should help her constituents understand why it’s necessary to control what pensions are paid to future public employees. And it wouldn’t hurt to communicate why she must do a better job tracking what Oregon can afford to pay state workers in salary and health care in years to come.

 

Editorial: Tax plan more detailed than spending cuts

Mail Tribune

Rep. Knute Buehler, R-Bend, told the Democratic leaders he wanted them to promise the new revenue wouldn’t go for teachers’ salary increases, health benefits or PERS payments. The tax plan, he said, was “laser-focused,” while the proposed spending cuts were “quite fuzzy.”

We agree. And voters will want the same guarantees.

 

Editorial: Law is not necessary

Baker City Herald

But we disagree that a law — and in particular the constitutionally shaky bill that the Oregon Senate approved this week — is likely to accomplish, in any meaningful way, this noble objective. Senate Bill 719 passed by a 17-11 vote and is now under consideration in the House.  Besides its potential conflicts with the Second Amendment, our main concern with the bill is that it focuses solely on the means by which a person might harm himself or others, but has nothing to do with the person’s motivations. And we’re not convinced that those motivations can be addressed through legislation. Not every societal problem can be fixed with a law.

 

Editorial: Marion County, Salem would benefit greatly from sobering centers

Statesman Journal

We support an effort being sponsored by Rep. Duane Stark, a Republican from Grants Pass and co-sponsored by Rep. Knute Buehler, a Republican from Bend.Stark said he knows of a few other states piloting programs. but Oregon has a chance to lead on this issue. The Senate should vote ‘yes’ when the bill comes before it. As Buehler pointed out, more innovative ideas like this are needed “that emphasize compassion and rehabilitation rather than incarceration and punishment.”

 

Opinion: It’s not Trump or Republicans; Portland has a riot problem

Bill Currier is the chairman of the Oregon Republican Party.

It’s time to face it: First and foremost, Portland has a “riot” problem, not a Trump problem or a Republican problem. The strategy of appeasing rioters at the expense of the law-abiding citizens and business owners has entirely failed, and the people have had enough of it. Violent protests aren’t protests. They are riots. It is now time for the “Riot Games” to end. Local authorities must do more than catch and release these rioters. As a start, they must charge, prosecute, convict and incarcerate them. But just putting these rioters in jail isn’t enough.

 

Opinion: Rent control won’t solve the problem

Jim St. Clair is a real estate broker in Eugene

House Bill 2004 is trying to fix the wrong problem. As noted by several state representatives, this bill won’t build any new housing units. Other bills are under consideration that are intended to encourage new housing projects, but they won’t have much of an effect when Oregon cities start wiping out the local real estate returns. Removing the ban on rent controls is a dangerous approach to the state’s housing crisis.

 

OREGONIANS IN CONGRESS

 

Wyden: Resist GOP health care overhaul

Portland Tribune

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden’s 818th town hall meeting was almost an hour old Saturday night before he got to Topic A before the Senate. “My view is that the House bill would slam Oregon with a tsunami of suffering that would plunge thousands of Oregonians into debt and anguish,” Wyden told hundreds cheering him on at Liberty High School in Hillsboro. “I want you to know I will do everything in my power, night and day, to derail that House bill. That’s what Oregonians have been asking me to do.”

 

Principles of Economic Prosperity

Trending Republican – most detailed map ever

Voting down to the precinct level throughout the US.

2008

2012

2016

Trend in Right-to-Carry laws

Setting the Record Straight – Elections and Outreach

British Prime Minister Theresa May

Big Joe at “Womens March” – viral video

Truth in Humor

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Blue America

Portland has become an embarrassment. We need to fix Oregon.

 

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Why “Democratic” Socialism Doesn’t Work

Here is the definitive word on “Democratic Socialism” – at least on video, that covers all the basics.

Final Results

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Top 10 Clinton scandals exposed by WikiLeaks

1. Mrs. Clinton had cozy and improper relationship with the mainstream media.

2. The State Department paid special attention to “Friends of Bill.”

3. Mrs. Clinton argued for “a hemispheric common market with open trade and open borders.”

4. The Clinton campaign was in touch with Department of Justice officials regarding the release of her emails.

5. The Clinton camp was tipped off to the release of the Benghazi emails.

6. Mrs. Clinton admitted sometimes her public and private positions differ.

7. Mrs. Clinton’s spokesman mocked Catholics and evangelicals as “severely backwards.”

8. Mrs. Clinton admitted she has a hard time relating to the struggles of the middle class.

9. Mrs. Clinton campaign used Benghazi as a distraction from the email scandal.

10. The Clinton team strategized on how to delay releasing emails, knowing it was against the law.

Must Read-Guns and Drugs

A perspective based on facts…not democratic spin.
There are 30,000 gun related deaths per year by firearms, and this number is not disputed.   U.S. population 324,059,091 as of Wednesday, June 22, 2016.

Do the math:   0.000000925% of the population die from gun related actions each year.   Statistically speaking, this is insignificant!

What is never told, however, is a breakdown of those 30,000 deaths, to put them in perspective as compared to other causes of death:

.    65%  of those deaths are by suicide which would never be prevented by gun laws

.    15%  are by law enforcement in the line of duty and justified

.    17%  are through criminal activity, gang and drug related or mentally ill persons – gun violence

.    3%  are accidental discharge deaths

So technically, “gun violence” is not 30,000 annually, but drops to 5,100.  Still too many?  Well, first, how are those deaths spanned across the nation?

.    480 homicides (9.4%)  were in Chicago

.    344 homicides (6.7%)  were in Baltimore

.    333 homicides (6.5%)  were in Detroit

.    119 homicides (2.3%)  were in Washington D.C.  (a 54% increase over prior years)

So basically, 25% of all gun crime happens in just 4 cities.   All 4 of those cities have strict gun laws, so it is not the lack of law that is the root cause.

This basically leaves 3,825 for the entire rest of the nation  –  or about 75 deaths per state.  That is an average because some States have much higher rates than others.

For example, California had 1,169  –  and Alabama had 1.

Now, who has the strictest gun laws by far?   California, of course, but understand, so it is not guns causing this.  It is a crime rate spawned by the number of criminal persons residing in those cities and states.   So if all cities and states are not created equally, then there must be something other than the tool causing the gun deaths.

Are 5,100 deaths per year horrific?   How about in comparison to other deaths?  All death is sad and especially so when it is in the commission of a crime but that is the nature of crime.  Robbery, death, rape, assault  –  all are done by criminals and thinking that criminals will obey laws is ludicrous.  That’s why they are criminals.

But what about other deaths each year?

.  40,000+ die from a drug overdose – THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR THAT!
.  36,000 people die per year from the flu, far exceeding the criminal gun deaths

.  34,000 people die per year in traffic fatalities (exceeding gun deaths even if you include suicide)

Now it gets good:

.  200,000+ people die each year (and growing) from preventable medical errors.    You are safer in Chicago than when you are in a hospital!

.  710,000 people die per year from heart disease.   It’s time to stop the double cheeseburgers!
So what is the point?   If Obama and the anti-gun movement focused their attention on heart disease, even a 10% decrease in cardiac deaths would save twice the number of lives annually of all gun-related deaths (including suicide, law enforcement, etc.).   A 10% reduction in medical errors would be 66% of the total gun deaths or 4 times the number of criminal homicides  ……  Simple, easily preventable 10% reductions!

So you have to ask yourself, in the grand scheme of things, why the focus on guns?   It’s pretty simple.  Taking away guns gives control to governments.

The founders of this nation knew that regardless of the form of government, those in power may become corrupt and seek to rule as the British did by trying to disarm the populace of the colonies.    It is not difficult to understand that a disarmed populace is a controlled populace.

Thus, the second amendment was proudly and boldly included in the U.S. Constitution.   It must be preserved at all costs.

So the next time someone tries to tell you that gun control is about saving lives, look at these facts and remember these words from Noah Webster:  “Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed, as they are in almost every kingdom in Europe.   The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword, because the whole body of the people are armed and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretense, raised in the United States.    A military force at the command of Congress can execute no laws, but such as the people perceive to be just and constitutional; for they will possess the power.”

Remember, when it comes to “gun control”, the important word is “control”, not “gun”.

Surprisingly, these are not the statistics you hear about from the media or from the White House.

Interfaith Group Asks US Government to Reject Report that Stigmatizes Religious Americans

Dear Mr. President, Senator Hatch, and Speaker Ryan:

We are a diverse group of American faith leaders from all political, religious and ideological perspectives. We write to you as the authorities responsible for appointing members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

We wish to express our deep concern that the Commission has issued a report, Peaceful Coexistence: Reconciling Non-Discrimination Principles with Civil Liberties, that stigmatizes tens of millions of religious Americans, their communities, and their faith-based institutions, and threatens the religious freedom of all our citizens.

The Commission asserts in its Findings that religious organizations “use the pretext of religious doctrines to discriminate.”

What we find even more disturbing is that, in a statement included in the report, Commission Chairman Martin Castro writes:

“The phrases ‘religious liberty’ and ‘religious freedom’ will stand for nothing except hypocrisy so long as they remain code words for discrimination, intolerance, racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia, Christian supremacy or any form of intolerance.”

We understand that people of good faith can disagree about the relationship between religious liberty and antidiscrimination laws in our country, and how that relationship should best be structured. These questions have to do with issues critical to the common good such as marriage, the family, contraception, abortion, and the source of human dignity.

At the same time, we are one in demanding that no American citizen or institution be labeled by their government as bigoted because of their religious views, and dismissed from the political life of our nation for holding those views. And yet that is precisely what the Civil Rights Commission report does.

The genius of American democracy is that it invites everyone into the public square, on the basis of full equality, to contend over the laws and policies that reflect our values and our understanding of the common good. In our system it is they–free citizens and voluntary institutions–that inform and drive the debate over the public good, a debate that the national government should not prejudice or distort.

The construction of our Constitutional settlement–this great experiment, as our first president called it–was in substantial part due to the religious ideas of the founding generation. The very foundation of our nation’s notion of equality—and in turn, the foundation of our various laws against discrimination—is the radical religious truth claim that “all men are created equal, and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.”

Each of us opposes hateful rhetoric and actions. We believe in the equality of all Americans before the law, regardless of creed or community. But we are both determined and unafraid to speak the truth about beliefs we have held for millennia. A robust and respectful debate over ideas is not something harmful to be demonized. Rather, debate is good for our democracy, and should be encouraged. Slandering ideas and arguments with which one disagrees as “racism” or “phobia” not only cheapens the meaning of those words, but can have a chilling effect on healthy debate over, or dissent from, the prevailing orthodoxy. Such attacks on dissent have no place in the United States where all religious beliefs, the freedom to express them, and the freedom to live by them are protected by the First Amendment.

We are grateful particularly to President Obama for his willingness to recognize that the religious and moral dimension of our laws is not only unavoidable, but has long served the cause of civil rights:

Secularists are wrong when they ask believers to leave their religion at the door before entering into the public square. Frederick Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, William Jennings Bryan, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King – indeed, the majority of great reformers in American history – were not only motivated by faith, but repeatedly used religious language to argue for their cause. So to say that men and women should not inject their “personal morality” into public policy debates is a practical absurdity. Our law is by definition a codification of morality, much of it grounded in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

(Call to Renewal, Building a Covenant for a New America, 2006).

In light of this, we call upon each of you to renounce publicly the claim that “religious freedom” and “religious liberty” are “code words” or a “pretext” for various forms of discrimination. There should be no place in our government for such a low view of our First Freedom—the first of our civil rights—least of all from a body dedicated to protecting them all.

We look forward to your reply.

Signed:

Most Reverend William E. Lori
Archbishop of Baltimore
Chairman, Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Bishop Gérald J. Caussé
Presiding Bishop
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Sheikh Hamza Yusuf Hanson
President
Zaytuna College

Charles Haynes
Vice President
Newseum Institute

Russell Moore
President
Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission
Southern Baptist Convention

Leith Anderson
President
National Association of Evangelicals

Ron Sider
Distinguished Professor of Theology
Eastern University
Founder and President Emeritus
Evangelicals for Social Action

Frank Madison Reid, III
Bishop
The African Methodist Episcopal Church

Anuttama Dasa
Governing Body Commissioner
Minister of Communications
International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)

Bishop Gregory John Mansour
Eparchy of Saint Maron of Brooklyn

Kit Bigelow
Religious Freedom Advocate

Cheryl Mitchell Gaines, J.D., M.Div., Senior Pastor
Regeneration House of Praise

Mohamed Magid
Imam at the Adams Center
Chairman, Interfaith Peace Corps

Nathan J. Diament
Executive Director for Public Policy
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America

Reverend Eugene F. Rivers III
President
Seymour Institute for Black Church and Policy Studies

Jacqueline C. Rivers
Executive Director
Seymour Institute for Black Church and Policy Studies

Thomas Farr
Director, Religious Freedom Project
Georgetown University
President, Religious Freedom Institute

Vacations and Extravagance VS Harry Truman

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Compare this “I am royalty” approach of modern politicians to Harry Truman, a man of character.


Harry Truman was a different kind of President. He probably made as many, or more important decisions regarding our nation’s history as any of the other 42 Presidents preceding him. However, a measure of his greatness may rest on what he did after he left the White House.

The only asset he had when he died was the house he lived in, which was in Independence Missouri. His wife had inherited the house from her mother and father and other than their years in the White House, they lived their entire lives there.

When he retired from office in 1952 his income was a U.S. Army pension reported to have been $13,507.72 a year. Congress, noting that he was paying for his stamps and personally licking them, granted him an ‘allowance’ and, later, a retroactive pension of $25,000 per year.

After President Eisenhower was inaugurated, Harry and Bess drove home to Missouri by themselves. There was no Secret Service following them.

When offered corporate positions at large salaries, he declined, stating, “You don’t want me. You want the office of the President, and that doesn’t belong to me. It belongs to the American people and it’s not for sale.”

Even later, on May 6, 1971, when Congress was preparing to award him the Medal of Honor on his 87th birthday, he refused to accept it, writing, “I don’t consider that I have done anything which should be the reason for any award, Congressional or otherwise.”

As president he paid for all of his own travel expenses and food.

Modern politicians have found a new level of success in cashing in on the Presidency, resulting in untold wealth. Today, many in Congress also have found a way to become quite wealthy while enjoying the fruits of their offices. Political offices are now for sale.

Beware the Useful Idiots

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Last 30 Days

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